Does Your Car Insurance Carrier Penalize You When You Were Not At Fault?

accident-frustration1

The Consumer Federation of America recently released new research that shows that safe drivers often see car insurance increases when they are involved in accidents  caused by other drivers.

car_insuranceAccording to the news release, in this new trend, some insurance carriers are penalizing their own customers when their customer did nothing wrong. It used to be that if you were involved in a collision that was not your fault, your own insurance company would not raise your rates. Makes perfect sense. Why should you be penalized when you did nothing wrong?

However, recently, a number of insurance companies decided to increase their profits by hitting their customers with significantly increased premiums when they had the misfortune to be involved in a crash that was not their fault. Two of the biggest New York carriers, Progressive and GEICO, were among the worst offenders of this new policy.

imagesInnocent drivers who don’t cause accidents should not be charged more because someone else hit them, J. Robert Hunter, CFA’s director of insurance and the former insurance commissioner of Texas, said in the news release. “Most people know that if they cause an accident or get a ticket they could face a premium increase, but they don’t expect to be punished if a reckless driver careens into them.”

CFA urged lawmakers around the country to prohibit penalties on innocent drivers. “Penalizing safe drivers hit by another car is not only very unfair; it also discourages them from filing legitimate claims,” Hunter said. “Lawmakers and regulators need to protect consumers from being punished when they’ve done nothing more than use the policy they have already paid for.”

CFA compared two good drivers – the only differences reflected in their socio-economic circumstances rather than their driving records – and found the following:

  • Higher-income drivers paid $78 more on average after a not-at-fault accident.
  • Moderate-income drivers paid $208 more on average after a not-at-fault accident.
  • Higher-income drivers faced a 6.6% penalty on average after a not-at-fault accident.
  • Moderate-income drivers faced a 9.6% penalty on average after a not-at-fault accident.
  • Excluding State Farm customers, who were never penalized, the average surcharges jumped to $99 (8.3%) for higher-income drivers and $264 (12.1%) for moderate-income drivers.

My suggestion: Contact your insurance agent and ask if your carrier has a policy of increasing premiums in not-at-fault crashes?

If so, I recommend you contact other insurance carriers as there are many carriers who do not increase premiums in this situation.

Thanks for reading,

Jim

___________________________________

James B. Reed
NY & PA Injury & Malpractice Lawyer
Ziff Law Firm, LLP
Office: (607)733-8866
Toll-Free: 800-ZIFFLAW (943-3529)
Blogs: NYInjuryLawBlog.com and
            NYBikeAccidentBlog.com

 


New Drone Pilots Need To Follow Regulations, Be Safe, Says NY and PA Injury Lawyer

drones-faa-hobbyist-regulations_h

As winter turns to spring in the Twin Tiers and people of all ages get ready to fly the new drone they got for Christmas, I would encourage all new owners of all ages to do some homework, if they haven’t already, before taking to the air.

113154-fullDrones are not toys. If a child will be flying the drone, prepare the child. Drones in the wrong hands can damage property, injure and kill people on the ground, and endanger passing commercial aircraft. It’s a HUGE responsibility, and in careless or uneducated hands, drones can be a dangerous weapon that could lead to criminal charges and lawsuits for the operator and their family. As an experienced personal injury lawyer, I know drones are going to be a big problem for those who don’t respect the power they possess in a drone.

I will say it again: It’s NOT a toy.

A few basics you need to know right now:

Go to the FAA website and look at the rules and regulations on drones. (Click on Part 107 for a summary of the rules and regulations.)

  • You need to register the drone – that is something a lot of people don’t know. The buyer should have been told that when they bought the drone but if not, Remember: Ignorance of the law is no defense.  You can register your drone here.  The good news?  It only costs $5.
  • You must have visual identification of your drone at all times. If you can’t see your drone, you are not operating it properly and you can be subject to penalties and fines.
  • You must not operate your drone over other people, under a covered structure or inside a covered stationary vehicle.
  • Daylight-only operations, or civil twilight (30 minutes before official sunrise to 30 minutes after official sunset, local time) with appropriate anti-collision lighting.
  • Your drone can’t exceed 100 mph or weigh more than 55 lbs.

Most of the new Twin Tiers drone operators will be recreational users. You have to register your drone with the FAA but you don’t need any special license operate it, like commercial users do. A handy site for recreational users is here.

Here are the website’s safety guidelines for small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS):

  • Follow community-based safety guidelines, as developed by organizations such as the Academy of Model Aeronautics (AMA).
  • Fly no higher than 400 feet and remain below any surrounding obstacles when possible.
  • Keep your sUAS in eyesight at all times, and use an observer to assist if needed.
  • Remain well clear of and do not interfere with manned aircraft operations, and you must see and avoid other aircraft and obstacles at all times.
  • Do not intentionally fly over unprotected persons or moving vehicles, and remain at least 25 feet away from individuals and vulnerable property.
  • Contact the airport and control tower before flying within five miles of an airport or heliport.
  • Do not fly in adverse weather conditions such as in high winds or reduced visibility.
  • Do not fly under the influence of alcohol or drugs.
  • Ensure the operating environment is safe and that the operator is competent and proficient in the operation of the sUAS.
  • Do not fly near or over sensitive infrastructure or property such as power stations, water treatment facilities, correctional facilities, heavily traveled roadways, government facilities, etc.
  • Check and follow all local laws and ordinances before flying over private property.
  • Do not conduct surveillance or photograph persons in areas where there is an expectation of privacy without the individual’s permission (see AMA’s privacy policy).

Do your homework, and be prepared before you take your first flight.

It’s a big responsibility. It’s not a toy.

Thanks for reading,

Jim

___________________________________

James B. Reed
NY & PA Injury & Malpractice Lawyer
Ziff Law Firm, LLP
Office: (607)733-8866
Toll-Free: 800-ZIFFLAW (943-3529)
Blogs: NYInjuryLawBlog.com and
            NYBikeAccidentBlog.com

Christina Sonsire Is First Women’s Soccer Player Selected For Georgetown Hall Of Fame

Christina Bruner, a standout striker and midfielder for the Georgetown University women’s soccer team from 1994 to 1997, will be the first women’s soccer player inducted into the university’s Hall of Fame in February.

Christina Bruner Sonsire, a standout striker and midfielder for the Georgetown University women’s soccer team from 1994 to 1997, will be the first women’s soccer player inducted into the university’s Hall of Fame in February.

Christina Sonsire of the Ziff Law Firm has been named to the Georgetown University Hall of Fame, the first women’s soccer player selected for the honor by the Washington, D.C., university.

Christina Sonsire.

Christina Sonsire.

Christina, who was then Christina Bruner, was a gritty striker and midfielder for the Georgetown University women’s soccer team from 1994 to 1997 while she earned a bachelor’s degree in Classics and International Relations in 1998. The medical malpractice lawyer went on to earn a law degree at the University of Montana.

Christina, the soccer team captain and a four-year starter, graduated as the team’s all-time leader in goals, assists, and total points. She held those records until 2009 and is currently ranked sixth all-time in goals scored (26), sixth in assists (18) and sixth in points scored (70) at Georgetown.

“I am so proud to have been a part of this fantastic program,” Christina said. “It is one of the greatest honors of my life.”

Christina and seven other Hoya sports luminaries will be inducted on Feb. 11 into the Georgetown Athletic Hall of Fame during halftime of the Georgetown-Marquette University men’s basketball game at the Verizon Center in Washington, D.C. There is a black-tie reception for the inductees after the game on the Georgetown campus.

“I never imagined something like this would happen,” she said. “It feels like an honor not just for me, but for all of my Georgetown teammates and the things we accomplished on the field together. Having the chance to take my daughters (Laurel, 7, and Noelle, 4) to a ceremony like this is one of the greatest gifts I could ever imagine. Hopefully it is something they will always remember.”

Part of the Hall of Fame induction involves a trip to Washington this coming weekend (Dec. 2-4) to meet with other inductees and have dinner with the university athletic director.

Christina is thrilled not only about the weekend events, but also because she will be on campus while her former team competes in the NCAA Division 1 College Cup in San Jose, Calif. Georgetown plays the University of Southern California in a national semifinal at 7:30 p.m. EST Friday, which follows the West Virginia-North Carolina semifinal at 5 p.m. EST. The Division I championship game is at 6 p.m. EST Sunday.

“I am thrilled for all of the current players and coaching staff. Making it through to the Final Four is an amazing accomplishment,” she said. “It is going to be so exciting to be able to watch the games on campus with the current students, and be able to include my daughters in such a historic event.”

Christina has also been inducted into the Halls of Fame for Notre Dame High School, Chemung County, and Section 4 for her scoring prowess as a high school player. Christina was coached by Steve Weber at Notre Dame, who remains the girls soccer coach. She was the all-time leading scorer in the former Southern Tier Athletic Conference, and played in the Olympic Development Program as well as in the Empire State Games.

Christina has coached in the Chemung Valley Soccer Association and Soaring Capital Soccer Club, and currently coaches a 7-and-under Ziff Law team in CVSA. Daughter Laurel, 7, is following mom’s example, and daughter Noelle, 4, can’t wait to get started. For now, with children to raise with husband Damian Sonsire, she is happy to get her kicks as a coach. She has worked with a core of children for more than two years.

“There is no greater joy that watching these young players develop,” she said. “They have grown so much, not just as players but as teammates, competitors, and young people. Coaching is one of the things I enjoy doing most.”

Christina Sonsire now loves coach a youth soccer team that includes her daughter Laurel, 7.

Christina Sonsire now loves coaching a Ziff Law Firm youth soccer team that includes her daughter Laurel, 7.

Thanks for reading and congratulations Christina!

Jim

___________________________________

James B. Reed
NY & PA Injury & Malpractice Lawyer
Ziff Law Firm, LLP
Office: (607)733-8866
Toll-Free: 800-ZIFFLAW (943-3529)
Blogs: NYInjuryLawBlog.com and
            NYBikeAccidentBlog.com

Is Your Surgeon Operating On A Second Patient At The Same Time?

surgery photo

Here is a new practice that Twin Tiers residents should remember when they, their family or their friends are facing medical procedures in a local hospital: concurrent surgery.

Last fall the Boston Globe newspaper reported Massachusetts General Hospital has surgeons who are performing surgery in two operating rooms at the same time. It’s called double-booking.

mass-generalDouble booking is a very controversial and risky procedure that is apparently an open secret in hospitals. But patients are rarely told. The surgeon responsible for the patient relies on a general surgeon or surgeon-in-training as he or she goes from room to room, performing multiple operations at the same time.

There is a lot of disagreement in the medical community over both the ethics and safety of double-booking. Let’s face it – it’s clearly done to make money and get as many patients through operating rooms in the shortest amount of time possible.

As the Boston Globe reports: Hospitals that permit double-booking consider it an efficient way to deploy the talents of their most in-demand specialists while reducing wasted operating room time. For patients, however, it can come as an unsettling surprise — especially when things go wrong.

At the very least, patients have the right to informed consent. In other words, patients must be informed their surgery has been double-booked so that they can make an informed decision as to whether they want to allow it.

It should be very interesting to see what transpires.

Thank you for reading!

Christina Sonsire
csonsire@zifflaw.com

 

 


Twin Tiers Drivers, Have You Heard Of The “Move Over” Law?

move-over-law

I recently received a message from a Twin Tiers resident after a friend of hers received a $300 ticket on a New York State highway for allegedly violating the state’s “Move Over” law.

The woman said her friend slowed down as she passed a police car, which was stopped with flashing lights. The officer was helping a motorist with a disabled vehicle.

Shortly after that, an officer pulled over her friend and informed her about the law and told her she always needs to slow down AND move to the passing lane. The woman who wrote the note to me said she had never heard of the law, and neither had any of her friends.

She suggested I warn our blog readers, and I thought that was a great idea!

I hope this story opens the eyes of many Twin Tiers drivers who were not aware of the law, and serves as a stark reminder to those who have heard of the law but did not know the specifics.

The Ambrose-Searles Move Over Law, which went into effect on Jan. 1, 2011, is named in honor of New York State Trooper Robert W. Ambrose and Onondaga County Deputy Sheriff Glenn Matthew Searles, who were killed by vehicles while helping motorists. The law is designed to protect law enforcement and emergency workers.

In 2012, the law was amended to include tow and service-vehicle operators.

When approaching these vehicles that are stopped, parked or standing on the shoulder, drivers are required to:

  • Reduce speed.

  • Move to an open lane (unless they cannot do so safely).

Read the full text of the law here.

The penalties are stiff:

It’s a moving violation and three points on your license. (It was two points in 2011, but increased to three points when the law was revised in 2012.)

The fine is $275 PLUS a state surcharge (tax).

If you have two violations of this law in an 18-month period, the state DMV slaps you with a Driver Assessment Fee, which STARTS at $300 and could go up from there.

So the next time you approach an emergency vehicle or service vehicles helping motorists, SLOW DOWN AND TRY TO GET OVER INTO THE NEXT LANE.

If it’s not possible to get over, give them as much room as you can and go slowly.

 

Thanks for reading, and take it slow out there!

Jim

___________________________________

James B. Reed
NY & PA Injury & Malpractice Lawyer
Ziff Law Firm, LLP
Office: (607)733-8866
Toll-Free: 800-ZIFFLAW (943-3529)
Blogs: NYInjuryLawBlog.com and
            NYBikeAccidentBlog.com

 

 


NY Medical Malpractice Lawyer Urges Albany To Change NY Medical Malpractice Law

medical-malpractice

New York State may soon offer new hope for medical patients with older malpractice claims who get locked out of the courthouse by the state’s short and unreasonable statute of limitations.  Currently, N.Y. is just one of six states still clinging to an old law that is grossly unfair to malpractice victims.  These states include Arkansas, S. Dakota and Idaho.

The law right now says the clock starts ticking on malpractice claims from the moment a medical error is made. People have 2.5 years to bring legal action from that moment. But for people who don’t discover the malpractice until after the 2.5 years, there is no legal remedy. The proposed new law, which would start the 2.5-year clock at the time of discovery, would be much better for residents and is LONG overdue.

Urge State Sen. Tom O'Mara to co-sponsor the new medical malpractice legislation.

Urge State Sen. Tom O’Mara to support the new medical malpractice legislation.

Let me use an example to illustrate the importance of the new law. Assume a woman had a mammogram three years ago that was incorrectly read and she is not told that the mammogram revealed breast cancer.

A repeat mammogram done today shows the breast cancer, which is now much bigger and the cancer has spread to other organs.  In reviewing the current mammogram, the doctor looks back at the mammogram that was done three years ago and realizes that a huge mistake was made and she should have been told she had a mass that could have been easily treated three years ago.

Under our current law, she would not be able to pursue legal action because the 2.5-year time limit for medical malpractice claims has already expired.

So there is new hope in Albany right now, but I need your help.

I urge Twin Tiers residents to support the state legislation, which passed the state Assembly and is now in the state Senate. New York is just one of six states that has the old law.

State Sen. Tom Libous, R-Binghamton, is the sponsor of this important bill and he is joined by 33 co-sponsors.   Our local state Sen. Tom O’Mara, R-Big Flats, has not become a co-sponsor.

I urge all Southern Tier residents to contact Sen. O’Mara’s office and ask him to support the new law. Gov. Cuomo has said he will sign it once it passes in the Senate.

Contact Sen. O’Mara’s office here.

Thanks for reading and helping to make a difference,

Jim

Today’s topic was discussed on the June 17 edition of Law Talk on WETM News at Noon. Catch us every Wednesday, talking about legal issues in the news, at about 12:20 p.m.

_________________________________

James B. Reed
NY & PA Injury & Malpractice Lawyer
Ziff Law Firm, LLP
Office: (607)733-8866
Toll-Free: 800-ZIFFLAW (943-3529)
Blogs: NYInjuryLawBlog.com and
            NYBikeAccidentBlog.com


Marine Corps Veterans And Families Once Stationed At Camp Lejeune Could Face Serious Health Risks, Says NY and PA Injury Lawyer

Jack Schamel Smaller File

Jack Schamel, Former Marine and Licensed Workers Comp Rep.

The Ziff Law Firm wants our many friends in the military veteran community to know about a serious health risk linked to a Marine Corps base in North Carolina, and health benefits they may qualify for now.

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs has announced that Marines Corps veterans and their families who lived in or worked at the Camp Lejeune Marine Corps base from the 1950s through the 1980s may have serious health conditions because they were exposed to contaminated water.

Jack Schamel was a Marine in the 1950s.

Jack Schamel was a Marine in the 1950s.

The VA said the water had industrial solvents, benzene and other chemicals. As a result, the VA is paying medical benefits to help the veterans and their families.

Veterans and family members who served in active duty or resided at Camp Lejeune for 30 days or more between Aug. 1, 1953, and Dec. 31, 1987, may be eligible for VA health benefits for 15 medical conditions.

This terrible story has hit close to home for the Ziff Law Firm family. Our longtime Licensed Workers’ Compensation Representative, Jack Schamel, is one of the Marine Corps veterans exposed at Camp Lejeune.

Jack is battling a form of blood cancer called multiple myeloma and the VA is now paying $12,000 a month for the medication he takes. He tells me the VA is also paying for doctor co-pays for the past.

Jack, who retired as a sergeant in 1958 after five years in the corps, was at Camp Lejeune in 1954 and 1958.

Jack has this message for others who were at Camp Lejeune:

“This information was not widely publicized, so there are many veterans out there who have no idea what they may be entitled to as a result of being stationed at Camp Lejeune.

“If veterans were stationed at Lejeune and they have any of the conditions listed on the VA website, they most likely would be automatically approved.

“Even if they are not sick now, they should register in case they become ill later.

“All veterans have to do is get their military records and send a copy of the page showing their duty stations to the VA to get started.

“This medical program has been a life saver for me since I did not want to pay $12,000 a month for medication.”

To learn more about the medical program and what it covers, click here.

To request medical records, click here.

Thanks for reading!

Jim Reed, NY & PA Injury Lawyer
jreed@zifflaw.com

 

 

                

 

 


Be Sure Your Sidewalk Is Safely Clear Of Ice And Snow This Winter, Says NY and PA Injury Lawyer

edmonton-slippery-sidewalks

It’s January in the Twin Tiers, and even though we have not seen a lot of snow yet this winter, we have seen plenty of ice on sidewalks and roadways.

icy signIt will be treacherous walking until we get our January thaw.

So if you slip and fall and are injured on someone else’s sidewalk, who is responsible?

Generally, it’s the property owners’ responsibility to make sure their sidewalk is clear of snow, ice and any other hazards.

In the City of Elmira, for example, homeowners are required by both city and state codes to clear their sidewalks.

Section 302.3 of the Property Maintenance Code of the State of NY requires a homeowner to do the following: All sidewalks, walkways, stairs, driveways, parking spaces and similar areas shall be kept in a proper state of repair, and maintained free from hazardous conditions.

In the City of Elmira, homeowners are responsible for clearing snow and ice from the sidewalk in front of their property. If you fail to clear the sidewalk within 12 hours after it starts snowing, you can be fined $100 by Code Enforcement. It is also the homeowner’s responsibility to shovel out fire hydrants on or near their property. If a fire were to break out, the Elmira Fire Department would lose valuable time attempting to locate and dig out a buried fire hydrant.

The Elmira Department of Public Works clears the sidewalk from all city-owned properties and parks with tractors.

Aside from legal obligations, keeping your property safe is the right thing to do for your neighbors! Nobody wants to have a person fall on their property because they did not bother to shovel or salt icy spots.

The bottom line is if you fail to clean your walk and someone falls on your property, you are more than likely to face some sort of legal ramifications.

I talk to people all the time who fall on snow and ice and the first thing we investigate is whether that property owner properly cleared their sidewalk of snow and ice. If you didn’t, you could face civil liability and the insurance company handling your homeowners’ insurance will have to deal with it.

Lately, I have noticed many business owners don’t clear the snow and ice from their property. That is inexcusable. You are inviting people to come to your business and at a minimum you should make it safe so people can get there without hurting themselves.

It’s winter and it’s New York State. It’s simple. Do the right thing. Make plans to keep your property safe, because if you don’t and someone is injured or killed on your property, you could face some major legal troubles.

This blog post was adapted from a “Law Talk” segment with me during the WETM News at Noon on Jan. 14, 2015. Ziff Law Firm lawyers discuss legal issues in the news at 12:20 p.m. every Wednesday on Law Talk. Set your DVR to catch the five-minute segments each week!

Thanks for reading!

Jim

_________________________________

James B. Reed
NY & PA Injury & Malpractice Lawyer
Ziff Law Firm, LLP
Office: (607)733-8866
Toll-Free: 800-ZIFFLAW (943-3529)
Blogs: NYInjuryLawBlog.com and
            NYBikeAccidentBlog.com

 


Outspoken Doctor’s Great TED Talk Pulls Back Curtain On Secrecy Of Medical Community, Says NY and PA Medical Malpractice Attorney

Dr. Leana Wen.

Dr. Leana Wen.

I recently learned about a great TED Talk about the secrecy in the medical community from a local doctor.

Dr. Leana Wen of Washington, D.C., talked for 15 minutes about all the things your doctor won’t tell you. An emergency physician, Dr. Wen was born in Shanghai but came to America as a child. She was a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford and is now the director of Patient-Centered Care Research in the Department of Emergency Medicine at George Washington University

You can learn more about the TED Talk here.

Dr. Wen is leading a campaign called Who’s My Doctor, a long-overdue drive for transparency in medicine. Among other things, Dr. Wen feels that Dr’s have an obligation to let their patient’s know if they are receiving compensation of any sort from drug or medical device manufacturers.  Her point is a good one:  a patient has a right to know if their Dr. has any financial interest in recommending a particular drug or device as that financial interest may consciously or sub-consciously influence their recommendation.

I would encourage everyone to watch the TED Talk — it is only about 15 minutes — and learn more about Dr. Wen by clicking on the links above.

Her TED Talk is insightful for anyone navigating the difficult world of medical care. And even if you or someone you love is not in that position now, sooner or later, we will all need some form of medical care.

So be prepared.

I particularly liked the message: “Openness improves care, reduces mistakes and results in less medical malpractice.”

I find it disconcerting that lawyers are ethically required to notify clients when they have a conflict of interest that might impair their judgment but doctors do not have a similar ethical requirement to do so.

I am mystified how doctors can receive hundreds of thousands of dollars a year serving as “consultants” to drug companies yet they are not required to disclose that very relevant information to their patients when making decisions about what particular drugs they will to treat that patient.

Here are some excerpts:

  • “We can bridge the disconnect between what doctors do and what patients need. We can get there because we have been there before and we know that transparency gets us to that trust.”

  • “It’s not just patients who are scared. Doctors are scared, too. We are afraid of patients finding out who we are and what medicine is all about. So what do doctors do? We put on our white coats and we hide behind them. And of course the more we hide, the more people want to know what we are hiding.”

  • “The sickness of fear has taken over and the patients suffer the consequences.”

  • “Being totally transparent is scary. You feel naked, exposed. and vulnerable. But that vulnerability, that humility, it can be an extraordinary benefit to the practice of medicine. When doctors are willing to step off their pedestals, take off our white coats and show our patients who we are and what medicine is all about, that’s when we begin to overcome the sickness of fear.”

I would conclude with a challenge to our local doctors to join those thoughtful doctors who have already signed up on Who’s My Doctor. It seems to me that if you have nothing to hide, why wouldn’t you agree to provide the basic information necessary for patients to make an informed decision about the doctor with whom they wish to treat?

Thanks for reading,

Jim

_________________________________

James B. Reed
NY & PA Injury & Malpractice Lawyer
Ziff Law Firm, LLP
Office: (607)733-8866
Toll-Free: 800-ZIFFLAW (943-3529)
Blogs: NYInjuryLawBlog.com and
            NYBikeAccidentBlog.com

 

 

 


‘Inspiring’ Day On Judicial Panel for Ziff Law partner Christina Sonsire

New York State Court of Appeals.

New York State Court of Appeals.

Christina Sonsire called Sept. 12 “one of the most interesting and inspiring days in my legal career.” That was the day our Ziff Law attorney and 11 of the other top trial lawyers in the state interviewed seven candidates for the New York State Court of Appeals, the top court in the state, in Albany,

“The finalists were so intellectually outsanding that at times we were almost in awe of their answers,” Christina said.

Christina Sonsire.

Christina Sonsire.

The panel of trial lawyers, assembled by the New York State Academy of Trial Lawyers, advised Gov. Andrew Cuomo on his selection of a new justice following the day of interviews Friday.

Beyond respect for the great judicial minds, Christina also brought home some lessons that helped her immediately in her practice.

“Several candidates were sitting appellate-level judges, and listening to them talk about what is most persuasive to them or what they look for in cases when they are deciding appeals was incredibly helpful,” she said. “I was coming back to the office to write an appeal on a case and the discussion is very much on my mind as I begin to draft it.”

She sees similarities in working with juries and appellate judges.

“When you are talking to members of a jury, you want to give them something to take back with them to the jury room so they can fight for your client when you are not there,” she said. “You want to give them facts, data and arguments they need so that when they go back to the jury room to discuss the case, they might fight for your client.

“Appellate work is very similar. Instead of a jury, you have a panel of appellate judges, and you have to give them enough facts and be as persuasive as you can so they fight for your client when the sit together to decide the case.”

Lawyers across the state have taken note of Christina’s skill as a trial lawyer. Christina is a member of the board of the New York State Academy of Trial Lawyers and was appointed to the judicial panel by Academy Executive Director Michelle J. Stern.

Christina was selected because of her strong record as a plaintiffs’ attorney, primarily in medical malpractice cases. She has also lectured extensively across the state.

And Christina was the ONLY trial lawyer on the panel chosen to represent the Elmira, Corning, Ithaca and Binghamton region.

The state Commission on Judicial Nomination announced the judicial finalists in a letter to Cuomo on Sept. 3. Cuomo then asked the Academy and other state bar associations to screen the candidates and make a recommendation.

Cuomo is expected to soon announce his selection.

The committee will meet again later in the fall to interview candidates for another position soon to open on the top court.

“It was a great honor to be named to this committee and meet so many professionals with great legal experience. I am sure every time I go to Albany for a meeting, I will come back with new ideas and strategies that will help my clients at Ziff Law.”

Thanks for reading,

Jim

_________________________________

James B. Reed
NY & PA Injury & Malpractice Lawyer
Ziff Law Firm, LLP
Office: (607)733-8866
Toll-Free: 800-ZIFFLAW (943-3529)
Blogs: NYInjuryLawBlog.com and
            NYBikeAccidentBlog.com